The Faces and Fists of Wong Jack Man

Since posting the sad announcement at the beginning of this year, of Sifu Wong Jack Man’s death, we’ve had the opportunity to speak to and hear from several of his students, each with his own story. For instance we—along with, apparently, many other people—did not know that Wong Sifu practiced the additional styles of Xing Yi and Tai Chi, along with his more famous Bak Sil Lum.

When a teacher has been teaching for many decades, myths and legends will naturally abound. In Wong Sifu’s case, the legend most associated with him concerned his famous fight with Bruce Lee. But I remember hearing another myth, that he taught in complete silence. However, some of his students report something far less exotic: that he was a teacher of sparse words and great actions—in other words, a classical teacher.

From some who trained directly under him, Wong’s exceedingly “heavy bones” were not an outgrowth of either Iron Palm or Golden Bell practices; there is little evidence that he practiced either. Does that mean that Wong Sifu did not know them, or merely that he did not give them much credit? Opinions on both sides, here.

All this in hand, Wong Jack Man was known as a high level practitioner of kung fu, thoroughly familar with his varied systems and teachings. There is no doubt that his memory will live for a long time in the hearts and hands of players and students.

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3 Responses to “The Faces and Fists of Wong Jack Man”

  1. Robert Louie says:

    Thank you for your kind words. His legacy lives on with his students.

  2. Edward Milon says:

    Thank you.

  3. Joey Reynolds says:

    May his memory be a blessing to all of us here in Saskatchewan Canada that study the beautiful northern arts,

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