Evolution of Wing Chun Kicking Techniques

wing chun kickingHappy to announce the arrival of an important new text in the Wing Chun canon: The Evolution of Wing Chun Kung Fu Kicking Techniques.  Osmond Lam’s beautiful book not only shows us some of the principles behind Wing Chun’s special and only sporadically known kicking methods, but adds a good portion of background technique on the famous Yip Man and his disciples, many of them well-known teachers. As an added benefit, there is a well-illustrated section from the author’s teacher, Stephen TK Chan, showing the Shortened 13 Legs with body shifting and appropriate hand positions.

This full color, oversized and fully English edition comes right out of Hong Kong. Color photographs break down the movements and—something unusual—almost every one of the photos taken over many years is individually dated for reference freaks.

Why wait to discover more about Wing Chun kicking techniques? Click here, or the link above to see more information on the book, and to order.

 

One Response to “Evolution of Wing Chun Kicking Techniques”

  1. David Leffman says:

    Wing Chun is generally thought to specialise in handwork, so this is an unusual book, focusing on kicking techniques from Ip Man’s lineage. Aside from the author’s own insights, it includes the perspectives of the famous Ip Man pupil Chow Tze Chuen (plus a section about his rare “Eight Chop Knives”) and his student, Chan Tak-Kwong, who in turn taught the author.

    There’s the usual interesting mix of history and personal anecdotes to set the system in context, but what made this book stand out for me was the fifty or so pages of wonderfully clear photographs illustrating the kicking techniques, and similarly uncluttered explanations of how each technique works. It’s also clear that the author has a full understanding of the difference between training methods and the way things are likely to turn out in an unrehearsed fight. A useful addition to any martial arts library.

Leave a Reply