Displaying posts filed under

Chin Na

Jun
5
2016

Practical Qin Na: Second volume arrives

We’ve just received the second volume in Zhao Da Yuan’s big series on Qin Na (Chin Na). This new text reveals dead-hand training, live-hand loops, counters, and even anti-weapon work. An entire curriculum on Qin Na; not just a few moves as so many others do it. This valuable multi-volume set is projected for at […]

Jan
19
2016

Restock: A few favorites return

We are always adding new titles to our Chinese book section, but every once in a while we are happy to see some old friends cycle back through. Our most recent shipments have landed limited quantities of those below (and more to come!)   Bajiquan Illustrated: A gem of a book with photos of GM […]

Jan
3
2016

Practical Qin Na: An Expanded Version of Zhao’s Reputable Text

Here at Plum we hold a special place in our hearts for Chin Na (Qin Na) and its exceptional methods of practical usage that can be applied in any style. Although there are several worthy texts on the subject, the one we have always recommended above all others is Tim Cartmell’s translation of Practical Chin […]

Dec
27
2013

Glance: Are there really Effortless Combat Throws?

Here’s a quick look-see and video review of Tim Cartmell’s book, “Effortless Combat Throws,” an excellent companion to his DVD of the same name. We hope people are enjoying these quick, informal reviews and getting a chance to look inside and become more familiar with these books. ECT is a fine example of a teaching […]

Feb
28
2012

New Views: Joanna Zorya and Zhu BaoZhen Bagua

Here are a couple of site-local videos we just put up. These are previews of our different products. With all the styles we show this make take a while… Some of Joanna Zorya’s work and the bagua of Zhu BaoZhen. Hope you like them.

Sep
11
2011

The Many Faces of Chin Na

Chin Na is not a style with a single face. Over centuries of necessity, it has actually developed many different profiles. Because there are only so many ways to bend joints wrong the differences in styles such as Japanese versus Chinese is actually less significant than the different ways in which Chin Na is used. Let’s look at these differences.